Friday, February 13, 2015

United Nations launches database of case law of Treaty Bodies

From the press release:
The UN Human Rights Office has launched a major public online database, http://juris.ohchr.org,   that contains all case law issued by the UN human rights expert committees, the Treaty Bodies.

“The database is designed to be a key reference tool for scholars, lawyers, civil society organisations, governments and civil servants, our UN partners and the general public,” said Ibrahim Salama, Director of the UN Human Rights Treaties Division. “Just as importantly, we hope it may help individuals who are preparing to submit complaints to the committees by giving them access to the views and decisions taken by the expert members on specific human rights issues.”

The database was developed using data from the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights (SIM) of Utrecht University School of Law. Since the mid-1990s, the SIM had developed a comprehensive record on the jurisprudence stemming from the decisions by four Treaty Bodies on complaints brought by individuals.  Over 20 years, academics compiled and indexed Treaty Bodies’ case law, making the SIM database the most authoritative online resource on this. Due to budget restrictions, the SIM stopped updating the database  from 1 January 2014 and took it offline on 1 January 2015. However, the SIM offered its data free of charge to the UN Human Rights Office.

“This allowed us to build our own database, with an expanded remit and search capability, and we aim to continue developing it. It is an important part of our efforts to make the work of the Treaty Bodies more visible and accessible, and we hope it will benefit a range of users all over the world,” said Mr. Salama.

There are 10 Treaty Bodies that review and monitor how States that have ratified a particular treaty are implementing the rights contained in it. Eight can also consider complaints by individuals who believe their rights have been violated and who have exhausted all the legal steps in their own country. 
The site http://juris.ohchr.org contains case law indexed by various categories, including State, date, subject and keywords, which can all be used as search criteria. Users can submit their comments on the functioning of the database as part of ongoing efforts to improve it.
* The Committees that can receive and consider individual complaints are:
  • Human Rights Committee (CCPR)
  • Committee against Torture (CAT)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)
  • Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
  • Committee on Enforced Disappearances (CED)
  • Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR)
  • Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

The UN Human Rights Office has launched a major public online database, http://juris.ohchr.orghttp://juris.ohchr.org/ that contains all case law issued by the UN human rights expert committees, the Treaty Bodies.
“The database is designed to be a key reference tool for scholars, lawyers, civil society organisations, governments and civil servants, our UN partners and the general public,” said Ibrahim Salama, Director of the UN Human Rights Treaties Division. “Just as importantly, we hope it may help individuals who are preparing to submit complaints to the committees by giving them access to the views and decisions taken by the expert members on specific human rights issues.”
The database was developed using data from the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights (SIM) of Utrecht University School of Law. Since the mid-1990s, the SIM had developed a comprehensive record on the jurisprudence stemming from the decisions by four Treaty Bodies on complaints brought by individuals.  Over 20 years, academics compiled and indexed Treaty Bodies’ case law, making the SIM database the most authoritative online resource on this. Due to budget restrictions, the SIM stopped updating the database  from 1 January 2014 and took it offline on 1 January 2015. However, the SIM offered its data free of charge to the UN Human Rights Office.
“This allowed us to build our own database, with an expanded remit and search capability, and we aim to continue developing it. It is an important part of our efforts to make the work of the Treaty Bodies more visible and accessible, and we hope it will benefit a range of users all over the world,” said Mr. Salama.
There are 10 Treaty Bodies that review and monitor how States that have ratified a particular treaty are implementing the rights contained in it. Eight* can also consider complaints by individuals who believe their rights have been violated and who have exhausted all the legal steps in their own country. 
The site http://juris.ohchr.org contains case law indexed by various categories, including State, date, subject and keywords, which can all be used as search criteria. Users can submit their comments on the functioning of the database as part of ongoing efforts to improve it.
* The Committees that can receive and consider individual complaints are:
  • Human Rights Committee (CCPR)
  • Committee against Torture (CAT)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)
  • Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
  • Committee on Enforced Disappearances (CED)
  • Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR)
  • Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)
- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15560&LangID=E#sthash.kNbW5m36.dpuf
The UN Human Rights Office has launched a major public online database, http://juris.ohchr.orghttp://juris.ohchr.org/ that contains all case law issued by the UN human rights expert committees, the Treaty Bodies.
“The database is designed to be a key reference tool for scholars, lawyers, civil society organisations, governments and civil servants, our UN partners and the general public,” said Ibrahim Salama, Director of the UN Human Rights Treaties Division. “Just as importantly, we hope it may help individuals who are preparing to submit complaints to the committees by giving them access to the views and decisions taken by the expert members on specific human rights issues.”
The database was developed using data from the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights (SIM) of Utrecht University School of Law. Since the mid-1990s, the SIM had developed a comprehensive record on the jurisprudence stemming from the decisions by four Treaty Bodies on complaints brought by individuals.  Over 20 years, academics compiled and indexed Treaty Bodies’ case law, making the SIM database the most authoritative online resource on this. Due to budget restrictions, the SIM stopped updating the database  from 1 January 2014 and took it offline on 1 January 2015. However, the SIM offered its data free of charge to the UN Human Rights Office.
“This allowed us to build our own database, with an expanded remit and search capability, and we aim to continue developing it. It is an important part of our efforts to make the work of the Treaty Bodies more visible and accessible, and we hope it will benefit a range of users all over the world,” said Mr. Salama.
There are 10 Treaty Bodies that review and monitor how States that have ratified a particular treaty are implementing the rights contained in it. Eight* can also consider complaints by individuals who believe their rights have been violated and who have exhausted all the legal steps in their own country. 
The site http://juris.ohchr.org contains case law indexed by various categories, including State, date, subject and keywords, which can all be used as search criteria. Users can submit their comments on the functioning of the database as part of ongoing efforts to improve it.
* The Committees that can receive and consider individual complaints are:
  • Human Rights Committee (CCPR)
  • Committee against Torture (CAT)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)
  • Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
  • Committee on Enforced Disappearances (CED)
  • Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR)
  • Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)
- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15560&LangID=E#sthash.kNbW5m36.dpuf
The UN Human Rights Office has launched a major public online database, http://juris.ohchr.orghttp://juris.ohchr.org/ that contains all case law issued by the UN human rights expert committees, the Treaty Bodies.
“The database is designed to be a key reference tool for scholars, lawyers, civil society organisations, governments and civil servants, our UN partners and the general public,” said Ibrahim Salama, Director of the UN Human Rights Treaties Division. “Just as importantly, we hope it may help individuals who are preparing to submit complaints to the committees by giving them access to the views and decisions taken by the expert members on specific human rights issues.”
The database was developed using data from the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights (SIM) of Utrecht University School of Law. Since the mid-1990s, the SIM had developed a comprehensive record on the jurisprudence stemming from the decisions by four Treaty Bodies on complaints brought by individuals.  Over 20 years, academics compiled and indexed Treaty Bodies’ case law, making the SIM database the most authoritative online resource on this. Due to budget restrictions, the SIM stopped updating the database  from 1 January 2014 and took it offline on 1 January 2015. However, the SIM offered its data free of charge to the UN Human Rights Office.
“This allowed us to build our own database, with an expanded remit and search capability, and we aim to continue developing it. It is an important part of our efforts to make the work of the Treaty Bodies more visible and accessible, and we hope it will benefit a range of users all over the world,” said Mr. Salama.
There are 10 Treaty Bodies that review and monitor how States that have ratified a particular treaty are implementing the rights contained in it. Eight* can also consider complaints by individuals who believe their rights have been violated and who have exhausted all the legal steps in their own country. 
The site http://juris.ohchr.org contains case law indexed by various categories, including State, date, subject and keywords, which can all be used as search criteria. Users can submit their comments on the functioning of the database as part of ongoing efforts to improve it.
* The Committees that can receive and consider individual complaints are:
  • Human Rights Committee (CCPR)
  • Committee against Torture (CAT)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)
  • Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
  • Committee on Enforced Disappearances (CED)
  • Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR)
  • Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)
- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15560&LangID=E#sthash.kNbW5m36.dpuf
The UN Human Rights Office has launched a major public online database, http://juris.ohchr.orghttp://juris.ohchr.org/ that contains all case law issued by the UN human rights expert committees, the Treaty Bodies.
“The database is designed to be a key reference tool for scholars, lawyers, civil society organisations, governments and civil servants, our UN partners and the general public,” said Ibrahim Salama, Director of the UN Human Rights Treaties Division. “Just as importantly, we hope it may help individuals who are preparing to submit complaints to the committees by giving them access to the views and decisions taken by the expert members on specific human rights issues.”
The database was developed using data from the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights (SIM) of Utrecht University School of Law. Since the mid-1990s, the SIM had developed a comprehensive record on the jurisprudence stemming from the decisions by four Treaty Bodies on complaints brought by individuals.  Over 20 years, academics compiled and indexed Treaty Bodies’ case law, making the SIM database the most authoritative online resource on this. Due to budget restrictions, the SIM stopped updating the database  from 1 January 2014 and took it offline on 1 January 2015. However, the SIM offered its data free of charge to the UN Human Rights Office.
“This allowed us to build our own database, with an expanded remit and search capability, and we aim to continue developing it. It is an important part of our efforts to make the work of the Treaty Bodies more visible and accessible, and we hope it will benefit a range of users all over the world,” said Mr. Salama.
There are 10 Treaty Bodies that review and monitor how States that have ratified a particular treaty are implementing the rights contained in it. Eight* can also consider complaints by individuals who believe their rights have been violated and who have exhausted all the legal steps in their own country. 
The site http://juris.ohchr.org contains case law indexed by various categories, including State, date, subject and keywords, which can all be used as search criteria. Users can submit their comments on the functioning of the database as part of ongoing efforts to improve it.
* The Committees that can receive and consider individual complaints are:
  • Human Rights Committee (CCPR)
  • Committee against Torture (CAT)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
  • Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)
  • Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)
  • Committee on Enforced Disappearances (CED)
  • Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR)
  • Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)
- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15560&LangID=E#sthash.kNbW5m36.dpuf

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

The Interweb: Remembered forever or forgotten in seconds?

This very interesting and thorough article by Jill Lepore in the New Yorker (Annals of Technology) is mainly about the Internet Archive and the Wayback Machine.
It describes the importance of being about to retrieve data from the internet, and gives some worrying examples of people trying to retract important information.
It's also about link rot, reference rot, and how these problems plague the world of legal research. There are a couple of enterprises under-way ( e.g. Perma.cc) to make link rot a thing of the past, which you might want to investigate before you cite webpages in your assignments.
I recommend you give it a read.
That reference?
Jill Lepore "The Cobweb: Can the internet be archived?" (27 January 2014) The New Yorker http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/01/26/cobweb;


Tuesday, December 9, 2014

First Revision Programme of Statutes Begins

Media Release

Christopher Finlayson, Attorney-General

9 December, 2014
The first revision programme of statutes has been presented to the House of Representatives, Attorney-General Christopher Finlayson announced today. “This is a banner day for the New Zealand statute books,” said Mr Finlayson. “It is the start of a systematic programme of statute revision which will make the law clearer and more accessible for New Zealanders. There has not been a major revision and consolidation of our legislation since 1908.”
“The presentation of some of New Zealand’s older, much-amended statutes will be improved without changing the substantive effect of the law,” said Mr Finlayson. “Revision will reduce regulatory costs by assisting individuals and businesses to understand more easily the rules that apply to them and contribute to the Government’s priority of building a more competitive and productive economy.”
The Legislation Act 2012 requires the Government to consult on, and approve, a 3-year revision programme for each new Parliament.
The acts selected for inclusion in the first programme are contract and commercial statutes, many of which are expressed in language and a structure that is out of date. The acts contain rules underpinning transactions in a commercial context and also in dealings between individuals who are not in trade.
The statutes on the programme will be restated in the current drafting style and format using clear language, rearranged and renumbered.
After the Parliamentary Counsel Office has drafted each Bill, a panel of eminent lawyers will examine and certify them before introduction to ensure the revision powers have been appropriately applied.
The revision bill certifiers are retired High Court Judge Hon John Priestley CNZM QC; President of the Law Commission, Hon Sir Grant Hammond KNZM; Solicitor-General, Michael Heron QC and Chief Parliamentary Counsel David Noble.
The Parliamentary procedure for enacting revision bills will be streamlined under recent changes to the House’s Standing Orders, as these bills will have no new policy in them, but the select committee process is retained.
The first 3-year programme of statute revision is now available at http://www.pco.parliament.govt.nz/revision-programme

Thursday, October 9, 2014

GOOD LUCK FOR EXAMS

Dear Students,
We wish you the very best during Exams.... study hard, take breaks, eat well... preferably not all at once!

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